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James Doolin

Artificial Landscape No. 11, 1969

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Catalogue number: 1

Liquitex on canvas

206.00 x 138.00

signed, titled, inscribed on reverse 'James Doolin / Los Angeles / 1969 / #11; title on label on reverse

Provenance:

Clive Evatt, till 2010

Exhibited:

Probably James Doolin - Artificial Landscapes, Central Street Gallery, Sydney, May 27 - June 13, 1970

Literature & references:

for other works of the series - they all employed the same semi-circular upper edge - see Other Voices, Vol 1, No 1, Sydney, June - July 1970,p 1;
Art and Australia, Vol 8, No 2, September 1970, p 123, for Artificial Landscape No 13, also illustrated in: Paul McGillick, introduction, Central Street, Charles Nodrum Gallery, Oct-Nov 1990, no 4.

Note:

James Doolin, in fact lived in Australia for less than three years. In that time his influence was little short of sensational, even though he exhibited only a relatively small number of paintings, mostly in Sydney. The mathematically ordered, geometric paintings and generally minimalist sensibility had an obvious influence, for example, on Jacks who switched at this time from a kind of biomorphic, curvilinear style to severe, reductivist grid painting. But Doolin had a deeper and, in some ways, more subtle influence. Firstly, he really knew what he was doing- in the sense that he had assimilated principles rather than merely imitating the surface features of other artists. This made his work very individual, but also gave it great depth. His semantic conviction of his arrangements of iconic marks and shapes was apparent in both his exhibitions at Central Street. In both sets of paintings- all called Artificial Landscapes- the meaning of the work was given greater amplitude by the ambiguous references to the phenomenal world: road signs and other public signs in the early (1966/67) set, and windows in the second (1969/70). In the latter group, Doolin also demonstrated what a subtle and educated artist he was by setting up what might be called an intertextual device in the form of the arch which implies the whole tradition of Western Landscape painting in which the landscape is viewed either through a literal window or through the metaphorical window of the picture frame. He proceeds to call attention to the device in a classical structuralist way by establishing an ambiguous relationship between object and field using warm and cool colours, colour graduation and complementary shapes. Second, Doolin was also influential by virtue of his professionalism. Robert Jacks is on record as saying Doolin taught a lot of young painters in Melbourne how to be professional artists by being a model of the self- discipline of long and regular hours in the studio using high quality materials and giving the pictures a high quality finish.

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Exhibition Catalogue

Artificial Landscape No. 11

James Doolin

1969

Liquitex on canvas, 206.00 x 138.00

SOLD

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Paul Selwood

2009

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Herbert Badham

1956

Oil on board, 53.50 x 42.00

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Tribal Dance

John Coburn

1971

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Meditation No 3

David Aspden

1977

acrylic on canvas, 154.00 x 116.00

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Michael Taylor

1973

oil on canvas, 183.00 x 122.00

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Daryl Hill

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(Northern Australian Landscape)

Ross Morrow

oil on board, 122.00 x 91.50

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Origins of the Figure

Anthony Underhill

1962

oil on linen, 127.00 x 122.00

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St Francis

Leonard Crawford

1961

oil, enamel and sand on board, 183.50 x 121.50

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The Warriors

Leonard French

1963 - 1964

enamel on hessian covered hardboard, 122.00 x 137.00

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Cycle

Leonard Crawford

oil on board, 61.00 x 122.00

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George Johnson

1962

enamel on board, 244.00 x 183.00

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Arrows from Heaven

Anton Holzner

1987

oil on canvas, 246.00 x 151.00

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(Untitled 9)

Roger Kemp

1965

enamel on board, 102.00 x 116.00

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Peter Upward

1971

acrylic on canvas, 182.50 x 122.00

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Untitled

Peter Upward

1963

PVA on board, 60.50 x 45.50

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Disturbance Series

Stanislaus Rapotec

oil on board, triptych, 122.00 x 365.00

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Hillside Calligraphy

David Rankin

1969

oil on board, 47.00 x 122.00

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Untitled

Tony Tuckson

c. 1957

enamel on paper, 76.00 x 101.00

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Paul Partos

1985 - 1987

oil, oil pastel & acrylic on linen, 127.00 x 101.50

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Leonard Brown

2009

oil on Belgian linen, 152.00 x 152.00

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Trees

Godfrey Miller

oil and pencil on canvas, 90.00 x 80.00

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The Big Zipper

Michael Johnson

1968

acrylic on canvas, 80.00 x 280.00

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Fontanelle #2

Tony McGillick

1968

acrylic and Perspex in modular sections, 91.50 x 122.00

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Since its establishment in 1984, the Charles Nodrum Gallery’s exhibition program embraces a diversity of media and styles - from painting, sculpture & works on paper to graphics and photography; from figurative, geometric, gestural, surrealist & social comment to installation & conceptually based work.